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LAPD ’53 fourth week on L.A.TIMES bestseller list

L.A. Times

See Los Angeles’ Rough Past With Crime Author James Ellroy

Review
Time

“It was 1953. Eisenhower was in the white house. The New York Yankees won the World Series for the fifth year consecutively. The theme music for the television series, “Dragnet,” rose to the top of the Billboard charts. It was also the year that Los Angeles had a record number of homicides—and more than twice as many suicides.”


We Talked to the Godfather of Crime Fiction, James Ellroy, About the Dark Days of the LAPD

Interview
Vice

“We called up Ellroy at the Los Angeles Police Museum where the author, who speaks with same shit-talking, machine-gun wit as his characters, was in pugnacious form. We asked him whether poring over sixty-year-old photos of mutilated corpses got his creative juices flowing, whether LA is still a ‘perv zone’ and if he really thinks that the American police can go on without reform after the deaths of Michael Brown, Eric Garner and so many others.”


NOIR CITY 6—James Ellroy Intro to Dalton Trumbo Doublebill

Article
The Evening Class

“With arms akimbo and legs planted firmly apart, James Ellroy delivered a hardboiled (and hilarious!) introduction to Noir City's doublebill of ‘Gun Crazy’ (1950) and ‘The Prowler’ (1951), both written by the infamously-blacklisted screenwriter Dalton Trumbo. Not only is Trumbo the uncredited screenwriter on The Prowler—screened at Noir City in a sprarkling new restoration print—but his voice can be heard as the voice of John Gilvray, the night-time radio DJ.”


True Crime

Review
We Heart

“1953 was a hell of a year for the Los Angeles Police Department. The bodies piled up: liquor store robberies gone bad, crazed spouses and cheating lovers, gang wars, back alley brawls and straight-up, cold-blooded killing. This was a decade that saw L.A.’s population boom, with suburban migration creating an inner-city vacuum that sucked in the worst elements. Those left behind who remained on the right side of the law, and the well-to-do in the new neighbourhoods trying to beat back danger on their doorsteps, relied on the LAPD to meet fire with fire…”


R.J. Cutler Takes On James Ellroy Memoir My Dark Places

Article
Deadline Hollywood

EXCLUSIVE: RJ Cutler, the maker of documentaries The September Issue and The World According to Dick Cheney who stepped into narrative film with If I Stay, has signed on to direct and co-write My Dark Places. That’s the memoir by L.A. Confidential author James Ellroy that focuses on the 1958 murder of his mother and Ellroy’s attempt to re-investigate some 36 years later, in 1994.

Also note coverage in “The Dissolve.”


Win a Perfidia signed screen print

Article
Entertainment Focus

To celebrate the release of Perfidia, the latest crime noir novel from the creator of L.A Confidential, James Ellroy, we’ve [“Entertainment Focus”] got 5 exclusive screen printed posters of the original cover artwork signed by the author to give away! If that wasn’t enough, we’re also throwing in 5 paperback copies of the novel just in time for the summer holidays.

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James Ellroy and Glynn Martin Discuss Their New Crime Book

Interview
Eddie Kim, L.A. Downtown News

“DOWNTOWN LOS ANGELES - A picture may be worth a thousand words, but it’s even better when paired with the razor-sharp prose of James Ellroy.

That seems to be the philosophy behind LAPD ’53 (Abrams Books). The book is a collection of gritty crime scene photos taken by Los Angeles Police Department officers over the course of 1953. Alongside those images are short stories by Ellroy, whose books include L.A. Confidential and The Black Dahlia. LAPD ’53 seamlessly melds facts with speculation and color straight from the novelist’s imagination.”


“He completely captures the LAPD crime scene”

Article
La Cañada

“After combing through the photo archives of the police museum, Ellroy discovered that 1953 featured the most unusual and striking imagery of the extensive collection and was inspired to write 25,000 words of text that illuminate L.A.'s underbelly and the controversial law enforcement practices of the time.”


Great Conversations: James Ellroy

Interview
Alex Simon, Huffington Post

“I interviewed James Ellroy, the great American noir novelist, at LA's venerable Pacific Dining Car in April 2001. We were there to discuss his latest book, The Cold Six Thousand, but wound up tackling a myriad of subjects over our three hour lunch. Ellroy sported a snappy fedora that I said would have looked great on Meyer Lansky. He barked a laugh and removed it, displaying his bald pate. When he looked at my full head of 33 year-old hair, his eyes narrowed: ‘That thing on your head real or a rug?’ ‘Real,’ I replied. Ellroy exhaled for what seemed like a full minute, then murmured: ‘Cocksucker.’ We were off and running.”


Destination morgue: James Ellroy spills LA's crime scene secrets – in pictures

Article
The Guardian

The Guardian has some great photos from LAPD '53 along with commentary.



Los Angeles crime scenes in 1953

Article
CNN

For a taste of Ellroy's collaboration with the Los Angeles Police Museum on LAPD '53, visit this image gallery at CNN.



Video Interview with France 24's Encore!

Interview
France 24

A must-see video as Ellroy opens up to Encore's Mariam Saab about starting over three decades into his literary career, the blurred lines between reality and fiction and the real love of his life.


Ellroy receives 2015 Grandmaster award from the Mystery Writers of America

Mystery Writers of America

Read about it at the TheEdgars.com or read the press release from the Mystery Writers of America.


“Ellroy is not only back in form—he's raised the stakes.”

Review
Kirkus Reviews

L.A. Unbound: James Ellroy Interviewed

Interview
The Quietus

Ian Johnston sits down with James Ellroy, veteran and pioneer of contemporary crime fiction, non-fiction and the blurring of those lines—the Demon Dog of American literature—to talk about the glossed-over injustice of Japanese-American internment in World War II, expanding Los Angeles across an entire world, and his new novel, Perfidia.


Where’s the Beef? James Ellroy’s Favorite L.A. Spots for Steak

Article
Los Angeles Magazine

Writer James Ellroy Talks Bachelor Pads, Beethoven, and a Certain Mystery Woman

Article
Details Magazine

Perfidia by James Ellroy, book review: The Finnegans Wake of crime novels

Review
The Independent

James Ellroy’s Perfidia: L.A. noir on steroids

Review
Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

Mysteries: Nights That Live in Infamy

The Wall Street Journal

In the shadow of Pearl Harbor, the murder of four members of a prominent Japanese family sets off a police investigation amid a frenzy of paranoia in Perfidia by James Ellroy.


The Big Sweep

Review
The New York Times Book Review

Dennis Lehane on Perfidia:

Few writers, once established in the public consciousness, have changed their style as drastically as James Ellroy. In his early days, Ellroy wandered through the boneyards of 1980s pulp, channeling Jim Thompson and Dashiell Hammett before he found his own voice with a trilogy of contemporary novels about a troubled, racist genius cop named Lloyd Hopkins. Hopkins was morally despicable in the day-to-day, but compared with the monsters he fought in the neon-drench of underworld Los Angeles, he was quasi-­angelic. When Ellroy closed out the Hopkins trilogy with 'Suicide Hill' in 1986, he shuttered his interest in topical culture as well and moved into the second incarnation of his career, that of the wildly romantic yet increasingly bilious chronicler of Los Angeles in the years immediately following World War II.



James Ellroy talks up his new L.A. Quartet

Interview
L.A. Times

Novelist James Ellroy prides himself on living in the past, and sometimes his obsessive backward gazing pays off. One lonely Saturday night a few years back, he stood at his window in the Ravenswood — the Art Deco apartment on Rossmore Avenue best known for Mae West's longtime residency — and had a vision.


James Ellroy on Glenn Miller's Version of Perfidia

The Wall Street Journal

A song about betrayal evokes Los Angeles in the 1940s for the author of The Black Dahlia.


Publishers Weekly Reviews Perfidia

Review
Publishers Weekly


a sprawling, uncompromising epic of crime and depravity, with admirable characters few and far between.